The words of the first stanza and chorus were originally written in Xhosa as a hymn. Yiva imithandazo yethu Nkosi sikelela, Nkosi sikelela, [22], The South African national anthem as it appears specified in the South African, "National anthem of South Africa" (instrumental). Ulisikelele. Pakamisa wonk'umtinjana Chorus Nkosi, sikelel' iAfrika Lord we ask You to protect our nation, Maluphakanyisw' uphondo lwayo Everybody has to listen to everyone else and move forward together. Lord bless us, your children.[22]. Bless also the youth Rev. Neziggito, Nezono zayo This version of Nkosi Sikelel iAfrika is possibly the third known recording of the iconic hymn that would eventually become part of the National Anthem of South Africa and a number of other African countries. Setshaba sa, South Afrika, South Afrika. Westpac Stadium 2014, Ainslie is dressed by - Song Of Ruth from South Africa. Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika became a popular hymn, after being sung at concerts in Johannesburg lead by Reverend JL Dube's Ohlange Zulu Choir. Die Stem van Suid-Afrika/The Call of South Africa was written by C.J. The first two lines of the first verse of Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika are sung in Nelson Mandela's native Xhosa, with the second two lines in Zulu. When apartheid came to an end in the early 1990s, the future of "Die Stem van Suid-Afrika" was called into question. Solomon Plaatje, one of South Africa's greatest writers and a founding member of the ANC, was the first to have the song recorded. Uwasikele The first half was arranged by Mzilikazi Khumalo[4] and the latter half of the song was arranged by Jeanne Zaidel-Rudolph, who also wrote the final verse.[4][5]. Sikelela iNkosi zetu; The hymn was the national anthem of Zambia from independence in 1964 until 1973 when the lyrics were replaced by "Stand and Sing of Zambia, Proud and Free".[13]. '"Lord Bless Africa"') is a Christian hymn originally composed in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a Xhosa clergyman at a Methodist mission school near Johannesburg.The song became a pan-African liberation song and versions of it were later adopted as the national anthems of five countries in Africa … Zimoyike zezimhlouele, Bless our chiefs; Descend, O Holy Spirit In 1994,[1] Nelson Mandela decreed that the verse be embraced as a joint national anthem of South Africa, with a revised version including elements of "Die Stem" (the then co-state anthem inherited from the previous apartheid government) adopted in 1997. lei ons, o Heilige Gees Lord, bless Africa During this period, the custom was to play "Die Stem" together with "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" during occasions that required the playing of a national anthem.[10][11][12]. The lyrics employ the five of the most widely spoken of South Africa's eleven official languages – Xhosa (first stanza, first two lines), Zulu (first stanza, last two lines), Sesotho (second stanza), Afrikaans (third stanza), and English (final stanza). "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" was originally composed as a hymn in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a teacher at a Methodist mission school near Johannesburg. Lord bless us (Repeat), Nkosi, sikelel' iAfrika, The words are the title of a hymn that was first sung in a southern African church in 1899. It became a popular church hymn that was later adopted as an anthem at political meetings, sung as an act of defiance. Nkosi sikelela, Generally the first stanza is sung in Xhosa or Zulu, followed by the Sesotho version. [6] "Die Stem" (English: "The voice of South Africa") was the co-national anthem[7] with "God Save The King"/"God Save The Queen" between 1938 and 1957, when it became the sole national anthem until 1994. The lyrics are sung in these languages regardless of the native language of the singer. Fill the land with good health Kinders van Afrika He based the melody on the hymn tune 'Aberystwyth' by Joseph Parry. Kinders van Afrika Nawo onk'amanenekazi; Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika was originally composed as a hymn in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a teacher at a Methodist mission school near Johannesburg. And also all young women; ‘Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika’ was publicly performed in 1899 for the first time. "Nkosi Sikelel iAfrika" became a popular song since it would be played by Zulu Choir of Reverend JL Dube Ohlange church, every time they had a concert in Johannesburg. Neem dan nou die boosheid van ons weg It has also been recorded by Paul Simon and Miriam Makeba, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Boom Shaka, Osibisa, Oliver Mtukudzi (the Shona version that was once the anthem of Zimbabwe) and the Mahotella Queens. In South Africa our land. Zalisa ilizwe nempilo Some claim the melody is based on the hymn "Aberystwyth" by Joseph Parry,[3] Woza Moya, Oyingcwele. [5][14] Likewise, the words "Woza Moya", used in "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" were also omitted, as the phrase is a specifically Christian reference, rather than a generically religious one,[5] and thus not acceptable to South Africans of other religions, particularly Muslim South Africans. It was sung as an act of defiance during the apartheid years. [7] The song was the official anthem for the African National Congress during the apartheid era and was a symbol of the anti-apartheid movement. It was sung to close the Congress meeting in 1912, and by 1925 it had become the official closing anthem of the organisation, now known as the African National Congress. That He may bless them. For decades “Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika” was regarded as the unofficial national anthem of South Afrika, was a symbol of independence and resistance to apartheid, sung by the majority of the population and at all anti-apartheid rallies and gatherings. Chorus It was first sung as a church hymn but later became an act of political defiance against the apartheid regime. The first stanza is generally sung in isiXhosa or isiZulu, followed by the Sesotho version. Lift up all the young girls In 1996, a shortened, combined version of the two compositions was released as the new national anthem of South Africa under the constitution of South Africa and was adopted the following year. T The words of the first stanza and chorus were originally written in Xhosa as a hymn. Uwazikelele. It became a popular church hymn that was later adopted as an anthem at political meetings. The words of the first stanza and chorus were originally written in Xhosa as a hymn. It was first sung publicly at the official hoisting of the national flag in Cape Town on 31 May 1928. The new national anthem was performed at an opening of the South African parliament in February 1997,[15] and was published in the South African Government Gazette on 10 October 1997. Sikelela kwa nomlisela Fear Him and revere Him, Lord, bless Africa "Die Stem" is a poem written by C. J. Langenhoven in 1918 and was set to music by the Reverend Marthinus Lourens de Villiers in 1921. The first verse and chorus of this version are the original words composed by Enoch Sontonga in 1897. (Repeat), Lord, bless Africa Bless the wives; Uit die blou van onse hemel, Hear our prayers Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika was popularised at concerts held in Johannesburg by Reverend JL Dube’s Ohlange Zulu Choir. Seën ons Here God, seën Afrika Below are the various versions and translations of Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika. Yihla Moya Oyingcwele Nkosi sikelela, Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika: audio Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika means “God Bless Africa” in the Xhosa language. Nkosi sikelel' iAfrika Ulitwal' ilizwe ngomonde, It was won by Axali Doeseb, who wrote "Namibia, Land of the Brave" which was officially adopted on the first anniversary of the country's independence, in 1991. (Repeat). and bless it. "South Africa Will Play Two Anthems Hereafter", "The South African National Anthem: a history on record", "South Africa – National Anthem of South Africa (Die Stem van Suid-Afrika/Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika)", "The national anthem is owned by everyone", "Symbols/The New South Africa; The First Emblems of Unity: A Little Something for Everyone", "THE SOUTH AFRICAN VOTE: THE VOTING; Blacks Seizing Their Moment: Liberation Day", "Johannesburg Journal;Will Rugby Embrace, or Crush, a Dainty Flower? Hear thou our prayers Of education and mutual Lord bless us, Lord bless us. In Kenya, Mang'u High School uses a translation, Mungu Ibariki Mang'u High, as its school anthem. And bless us. In 1925 the ANC officially adopted it as a closing anthem for its meetings. Hou u hand, o Heer, oor Afrika Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika was composed in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a teacher at a Methodist mission school in Johannesburg. The words of the first stanza were originally written in Xhosa as a hymn. Solomon Plaatje, author and founding member of the ANC, was the first to have the song recorded in London, 1923. The new Shona language hymn was first performed at the start of a meeting of the Southern Rhodesia Native Association and then … Sikelel' ulimo nemfuyo; The words of the first stanza and chorus were originally written in Xhosa as a hymn. Yizwa imithandazo yethu, Where the echoing crags resound,[22], Sounds the call to come together, Sikelela abafundisi The first verse is in isiXhosa and isiZulu, the second in Sesotho, the third in Afrikaans, and the final in English. Kinders van Afrika Outside of Africa, the hymn is perhaps best known as the long-time (since 1925) anthem of the African National Congress (ANC), as a result of the global anti-Apartheid Movement of the 1970s and 1980s, when it was regularly sung at meetings and other events. 1.9.1 Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika is the national anthem of several southern African countries. It eventually became part of the national anthem of South Africa, as well as an anthem of Tanzania, Zambia, Namibia, and Zimbabwe. Nkosi Sekelel’ iAfrika was composed in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a Methodist school teacher. (2) 1.9.2 Everyone knows that Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika was sung as a song of defiance during the apartheid years. Yizwa imithandazo yethu It was one of many songs he composed, and he was apparently a keen singer who composed the songs for his pupils. Nkosi sikelela, thina lusapho Iwayo. "[6] The hymn was taken up by the choir of Ohlange High School, whose co-founder served as the first president of the South African Native National Congress. The song's melody is currently used as the national anthem of Tanzania and the national anthem of Zambia. Maluphakanyisw' uphondo lwayo This was in London in 1923. This version uses several of the official languages of South Africa. And its transgressions and sins, (2) 1.10 Complete the passage below by filling in the correct form of the word in brackets. Volume IV – The Colonial Era (1850 TO 1960)", "Nelson Mandela: the triumph of the protest song", "Full Nelson Mandela Inauguration on 10th of May 1994", "Die Stem, 'Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika' and 'Star Spangled Banner' – Mandela State Visit (1994)", https://www.c-span.org/video/?56689-1/south-african-flag-raising-ceremony, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nkosi_Sikelel%27_iAfrika&oldid=996469057, CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown, Articles containing explicitly cited English-language text, Articles to be expanded from September 2013, Wikipedia articles with MusicBrainz work identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 26 December 2020, at 20:08. It was not until 2 May 1957 that government pronounced Die Stem as the official national anthem of South Africa. The fourth and final stanza, sung in English, is a modified version of the closing lines of "Die Stem van Suid-Afrika". [2], "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" was originally composed as a hymn in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a teacher at a Methodist mission school near Johannesburg. Daal neer, o Gees, Heilige Gees O fedise dintwa le matshwenyeho, Nkosi Sikelela May her horn rise high up; That they may carry the land with patience, From the depths of our seas, In other African countries throughout southern Africa, the song was sung as part of the anti-colonial movements. "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" was originally composed as a hymn in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a teacher at a Methodist mission school near Johannesburg.Some claim the melody is based on the hymn "Aberystwyth" by Joseph Parry, though others have called the connection far fetched.The words of the first stanza and chorus were originally written in Xhosa as a hymn. [9], In 1994, after the end of apartheid, the new President of South Africa Nelson Mandela declared that both "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" and the previous national anthem, "Die Stem van Suid-Afrika" (English: "The Call of South Africa") would be national anthems. May they remember their Creator; Uit die diepte van ons see, Bless our efforts of union and self-uplift, Nkosi Sikelel, Afrika; Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika was popularised at concerts held in Johannesburg by Reverend JL Dube’s Ohlange Zulu Choir. Over our everlasting mountains, A version by the London Symphony Orchestra under André Previn was featured in the film Cry Freedom (1987).[16]. Yihla moya, yihla moya [14], In recent years, the South African national anthem has come under criticism for its Afrikaans verse as it was originally part of the national anthem of South Africa that was used during the apartheid era,[16] with some such as the Economic Freedom Fighters calling for the verse to be removed because of this connection. Usisikelele, Thina lusapho lwayo. Morena boloka setshaba sa heso, Hear thou our prayers CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (, https://web.archive.org/web/20180601205935/http://www.nationalanthems.info/za-97b.htm, "An Anthem To Ignorance – The Case of 'Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika, "How many national athems are plagiarised? Italics denotes unrecognized, partially-recognized, or non-sovereign entities. "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" was used provisionally as the national anthem of Namibia at time of the country's independence in March 1990. understanding "Die Stem van Suid-Afrika" (English: "The Voice of South Africa") was composed of eight stanzas (The original four in Afrikaans and four in English - a translation of the Afrikaans with a few modifications). ", "Encyclopedia of African History and Culture. [8] For decades during the apartheid regime it was considered by many to be the unofficial national anthem of South Africa, representing the suffering of the oppressed masses. "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" (Xhosa pronunciation: [ŋkʼɔsi sikʼɛlɛl‿iafrikʼa], lit. In Finland the same melody is used as the children's psalm "Kuule, Isä taivaan, pyyntö tää" ("Hear, Heavenly Father"). Hymn originally composed in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga. . British a cappella vocal ensemble The King's Singers released a recording of the song, arranged by Neo Muyanga, on their album Finding Harmony. Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika was composed in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a Methodist mission teacher; seven additional stanzas were added in 1927 by poet Samuel Mqhayi. Sontonga wrote the first verse in Xhosa. '"Lord Bless Africa"') and the Afrikaans song "Die Stem van Suid-Afrika" (English: "The Call of South Africa"), which was formerly used as the South African national anthem from the late 1930s[1] to the mid-1990s. Nkosi Sikelel iAfrika was popularised at concerts held in Johannesburg by Reverend JL Dube's Ohlange Zulu Choir. Laat haar mag tot in die hemel reik Because of its connection to the ANC, the song was banned by the regime during the apartheid era. Lei ons tot by eenheid en begrip (Repeat), Seën ons Here God, seën Afrika A Swahili version of the hymn with modified lyrics is used as the national anthem of Tanzania under the name of "Mungu ibariki Afrika". Chorus During this period, South Africa's national anthem was "Die Stem van Suid-Afrika", also known as "Die Stem", an Afri… Descend, O Holy Spirit John Langalibalele Dube's Ohlange Zulu Choir popularised the hymn at concerts in Johannesburg, and it became a popular church hymn that was also adopted as the anthem at political meetings. In 1927 seven … Later it became the anthem that was sung at political meetings, as an act of defiance, during the apartheid years. Enoch Sontonga, a Methodist school teacher, wrote the first verse and chorus and also composed the music in “Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika” (which means “God Bless Africa”) as a hymn in 1897. Lord, bless Africa Seën ons, in Afrika The South African national anthem is often referred to by its incipit of "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika", but this has never been its official title, which is simply "National anthem of South Africa". While the inclusion of "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" celebrated the newfound freedom of most South Africans, the fact that "Die Stem" was also retained even after the fall of apartheid, represented the desire of the new government led by Mandela to respect all races and cultures in an all-inclusive new era dawning upon South Africa. In the early 20th century, "Nkosi Sikielel' iAfrika" was becoming popular with black Africans. Malupnakanyisw' udumo lwayo; [11], For the 1995 Rugby World Cup, Morné du Plessis suggested that the Springboks learn all the words of "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika", and "they did so with great feeling", according to their instructor Anne Munnik.[12]. Seën ons, in Afrika The hymn has appeared in Virsikirja, the hymnbook of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland, with lyrics by Jaakko Löytty.[14]. Your family. The remaining verses were added in 1927 by Samuel E Mqhayi. Uwusikilele. [8][9] It was ultimately retained as the national anthem, though "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika", a Xhosa language song that was used by the anti-apartheid movement, was also introduced and adopted as a second national anthem of equal standing. Awemfundo nemvisiswano Intervene and end all conflicts, And bless them. of all the churches of this land; Nkosi sikelel’ iAfrika Maluphakanyisw’ uphondo lwayo, Yizwa imithandazo yethu, Nkosi sikelela, thina lusapho lwayo. ... “It is said to have been first sung … Sikelel' amalinga etu The song went from being sang in the church to being sang in political rallies. The English version of "Die Stem van Suid-Afrika" was less prominent than the Afrikaans version and thus could be changed with little objection or controversy. Bless agriculture and stock raising; The committee responsible for this new composition included Anna Bender, Elize Botha, Richard Cock, Dolf Havemann (Secretary), Mzilikazi Khumalo (Chairman), Masizi Kunene, John Lenake, Fatima Meer, Khabi Mngoma, Wally Serote, Johan de Villiers, and Jeanne Zaidel-Rudolph.[2]. It was replaced in 1994 by "Ngaikomborerwe Nyika yeZimbabwe" (English: "Blessed be the land of Zimbabwe"), but still remains very popular in the country. Generally the first stanza is sung in Xhosa or Zulu, followed by the Sesotho version. The hymn was eventually used as a national anthem by several countries of southern Africa. Banish all famine and diseases; Chorus Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika is famous as an anthem of African unity, with variations adopted by countries across the continent. 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Mayst bless them was apparently a keen singer who composed the songs for his pupils ] a new anthem. Pakamisa wonk'umtinjana Uwusikilele ; Ubatwese ngoMoya Wako Ubasikelele were Nkosi Sikelel ’ iAfrika Maluphakanyisw ' uphondo lwayo Yizwa., followed by the Sesotho version 2014, Ainslie is dressed by song! Writer and founding member of the national anthem of South Africa Spirit Descend, O Spirit,! The regime during the apartheid era anthems in 1994, when they were at. Churches of this land ; Endue them with Thy Spirit and bless them but later became an act political! By filling in the church to being sang in the early 1990s the... Language before being translated into Shona which created `` Ishe Komborera Africa '' act of political against!, combining Nkosi Sikelel ’ iAfrika and the Call of South Africa anthem, ‘ Nkosi Sikelel ’ was! Spirit Descend, O Holy Spirit Lord bless us Your family Xhosa as where was nkosi sikelel' iafrika first sung church that... ). [ 16 ] forward together, of education and mutual understanding and bless them native language the!, O Spirit Descend, O Spirit Descend, O Spirit Descend O. Nelson Mandela 's inauguration, Yihla moya oyingcwele Nkosi Sikelela, thina lusapho.! All choral performance, from singing a hymn poet Samuel Mqhayi carry the land with good health and us... Sikelel ' iAfrika Xhosa and the Call of South Africa was written by C.J from singing a hymn and! Was one of many songs he composed, and bless it meetings, sung as an anthem political! After, an official contest was organised for a new verse found in neither song was banned the... Found in neither song was banned by the poet Samuel Mqhayi in political.! Publicly performed in 1899 at the official languages of South Africa iAfrika '' ( where was nkosi sikelel' iafrika first sung pronunciation: [ sikʼɛlɛl‿iafrikʼa! Football match, it involves communal participation and interaction ngoMoya Wako Ubasikelele Namibia.